Lecture - 6/24/99
Lera Boroditsky
Light & Eyes: Figures

Figure 1. Overview of today's lecture
[source: Goldstein, Sensation & Perception, 4th Ed.]

Figure 2. Wavelength is the distance between the two peaks of a sinusoidal wave

Figure 7. Light is changed by the objects it encounters in its path

Figure 16. A picture of a filament taken with a pinhole camera. In the image on the left, the hole was too big (blurring), and in the image on the right, the hole was too small (diffraction).
[source: Ruechardt, 1958]

Figure 17. Anatomy of the human eye
[source: Goldstein, Sensation & Perception, 4th Ed.]

Figure 18. Blind spot filling in
[source: Ramachandran, 1992]

Figure 19. Stare at the center of this image and try not to move your eyes. The surrounding gray will disappear.

Figure 20. Seeing inside an eye
[source: Wandell, Foundations of Vision]

Figure 23. Visual angle and object size
[source: David Heeger]

Figure 24. The lens changes shape to focus on objects at different depths
[source: David Heeger]

Figure 25. Correcting for far- and near-sightedness
[source: Gregory, Eye and Brain]

Figure 26. The lens gets more rigid as we age and is no longer able to accomodate sufficiently

Figure 28. Distribution of rods and cones in the fovea (left) and in the periphery (right)
[source: Curcio et al., 1990]

Figure 29. The three types of cones are sensitive to different wavelengths of light.
[source: Wandell, Foundations of Vision]

Figure 30. Distribution of rods and cones in the retina
[source: Wandell, Foundations of Vision]

Figure 34. Rhodopsin, the photopigment found in rods, changes color as it is exposed to more and more light. This is called bleaching
[source: David Heeger]

Figure 35. Reflection off a butterfly retina. The different cones reflect different color lights.
[source: David Heeger]

Figure 36. This dark adaptation curve shows the switch from cones to rods. The open circles are when the violet test color was no longer noticeable.
[source: David Heeger]

Figure 37. Photoreceptors pass their signals onto bipolar cells and then to ganglion cells.
[source: Rodieck, The first steps in seeing]